Claremont Consortium Tour

Claremont Consortium Tour

I participated in the undergraduate Claremont Consortium Tour for counselors, January 23-24, 2013.  The consortium represents the following liberal arts colleges:  Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer, Pomona and Scripps.  Claremont, California has a population of 37,780 and is located 35 miles east of Los Angeles.  The most convenient airport is located ten miles away in Ontario. 
Each college has its own distinct campus, personality, students and faculty, educational community, curb appeal and goals.  However, unlike many consortiums, each campus is very easily accessible, just by walking.  This planned convenience is ideal for cross-campus studies, social events, athletics, meal cards, and other college experiences.
An overview of highlights include:
  • Scripps has a very good education program; males can take classes at Scripps, just cannot enroll.
  • Claremont McKenna is a great place for “political junkies” and those interested in public leadership.
  • Pomona has the most comprehensive liberal arts program; good male/female balance; no single major dominates.
  • Harvey Mudd College is a response to the Sputnik Age; the smallest Claremont school and the most focused curriculum.
  • Pitzer offers more curriculum freedom.
The consortium is a good place for math majors with a combined number of >45 professors.  Majors are selected by end of second year.  All colleges use the Common Application and require a supplement, CSS/PROFILE and FAFSA.  Even though the colleges work together, they have independent qualities.  An option could be 4+1 programs (BA/BS + grad degree) with participating colleges.
Claremont McKenna College
-private; opened in 1946; became coed in 1976
-challenges students with world of ideas, world views, pragmatic twist
-focuses on public leadership
-individualized curriculum presents small classes; 9:1=student/professor ratio
-good faculty-student relationship
-Early Decision I, Early Decision II, Regular Decision
-110 clubs; D-III athletics
-3 semesters of PE required
-97% return for sophomore year
-most popular majors=economics, government, and psychology
-graduates pursue careers in law, business, government, foreign service, public policy,
education, international relations
-freshmen are expected to do research
-PERKS: self-designed majors, study abroad, pass/fail options, domestic exchange,
-all first year students must live on campus; no freshmen-only residence halls
-semester calendar
-regional accreditation (WASC)
-has Autism Center on campus; offer developmental psychology
-out-of-state population=56%
-14% admit rate
-SAT: CR=630-720; M=670-760; superscore SAT
-ACT: Eng=29-34; M=28-34; superscore ACT
-campus has intellectually social attractions; not a commuter campus
-2012-13 comprehensive fee=$58, 065
-90% of students do a paid summer internship
-”The Athenaeum” is an experience featuring dinner discussions among notables, faculty and students
-provide merit scholarships (30-40 annually); based on academic profile, high
achievement, upper 25% scores
-meet 100% of demonstrated need
-recommend families use Net Price Calculator on website
-legacy is not a defining admissions factor
Pitzer College
-private; opened in 1963; became coed in 1970
-community service is a graduation requirement
-social justice and responsibility is school mission
-1,099 population; 60% women and 40% men
-29% admit rate; average GPA=3.84
-Early Decision and Regular Decision
-SAT: CR=580-690; Math=590-690
-ACT: Comp=24-31
-test optional for students with 3.5 GPA or in top 10% of class
-out-of-state population=58%
-PERKS: study abroad (75%); domestic exchanges; self-designed majors
-regional accreditation (WASC)
-83% return for sophomore year
-68 clubs; D-III athletics
-freshmen must live on campus
-semester calendar
-”breath of knowledgement requirement”=26 credits/flexible credits
-most popular majors=psychology, sociology, media studies, political science,
environmental analysis, English & World Literature, art, biology, intercultural and
international studies
-12:1=student/professor ratio; average class size=16; no teacher assistants
-tuition and fees=$57, 266
-will meet 100% of demonstrated need
-no separate form for scholarships
-limited merit aid; financial aid is not available for international students
-governed by five core values
-freshman transition includes: mandatory orientation week for first year students; RA’s
monitor and mentor the students
-there is an academic liason for LD students; they must be cautious with the lighter
course load so it doesn’t affect financial aid
Harvey Mudd College
-private; open as coed institution in 1955
-777 students; 58% men and 42% women
-one of nation’s premiere engineering schools; science and math college with liberal arts
-majors offered=nine engineering; science; math
-curriculum includes exposure to humanities and social science courses
-graduation requirement=one year of indepth research or a challenging clinic project
-SAT: CR=680-770; Math=740-800; Math Subject II=760-800
-ACT: Comp=33-35
-require SAT Math Subject II and student’s choice
-SAT or ACT writing used for admission and application essay validity check
-freshmen can only enter in fall
-admit rate=19%; 12% for men and 37% for women
-Early Decision I, Early Decision II, and Regular Decision
-tuition and fees=$58,913
-will meet 100% of demonstrated financial need
-57% of students are not state residents
-Harvey Mudd is trying to increase minority population
-regional accreditation (WASC) and professional accreditation (ABET)
-8:1=student/professor ratio
-three semesters of PE required
-PERKS: self-designed majors; double majors; dual degrees; pass/fail options; domesticexchange programs; study abroad
-97% return for sophomore year
-most popular majors=engineering, math and physics
-standard LD services: tutors, tape recorders, untimed tests, extended time
-D-III athletics; 90 clubs; no social frats or sororities
-all freshmen must live on campus
-semester calendar
Scripps College
-private; opened in 1926 as women’s college
-966 undergrads
-portfolio, audition or tape recommended for art, dance and music programs
-Early Decision I, Early Decision II, and Regular Decision
-36% admit rate; average GPA=4.10
-SAT: CR=640-740; Math=640-710; WR=660-740
-ACT: Comp=29-32
-out-of-state students=52%
-tuition and fees=$57,088
-will meet 100% of demonstrated financial need
-56% gift aid awarded to out-of-state students
-regionally accredited (WASC)
-11:1=student/professor ratio
-PERKS: self-designed and double majors; 3-2 engineering with several universities,
domestic exchange programs; study abroad
-91% return for sophomore year
-popular majors=biology, English, math, studio art, psychology, political/international
relations
-standard services for LD students: notetaking, readers, tutors, tape recorders, untimed
testing, extended time for tests, priority registration, priority seating, and individualized
needs
-D-III athletics; 34 clubs; no social Greek life
-all freshmen must live on campus
-semester calendar
-college features Core Curriculum in Interdisciplinary Humanities
Pomona College
-private; open as coed in 1887
-1,586 students with equal balance of men and women
-SAT or ACT writing used for admission, advising, and validity check for essay
-SAT: CR=680-780; Math=690-770; WR=680-780
-ACT: Comp=31-34
-freshmen can only enter in fall term
-Early Decision I, Early Decision II, and Regular Decision
-admit rate=14%; 17%=men; 12%=women
-89% of first year students are out-of-state residents
-tuition and fees=$54,964
-committed to both need-blind admissions and fully funded need-based financial aid
-approximately 53% receive financial aid
-college is planning to build a visual art center
-trying to reach out to more international students
-regionally accredited (WASC)
-8:1=student/professor ratio
-one semester of PE required
-PERKS: self-designed and double majors; domestic exchange programs; study abroad
-99% return for sophomore year
-most popular majors=economics, English, politics, psychology, biology, history, neuro
science, international relations, media studies, public policy analysis and chemistry
-D-III athletics; 227 clubs; three frats
-all freshmen must live on campus
-semester calendar

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